Saturday, June 17, 2017

"Lawrence of Arabia", 1962 classic about the formation of Saudi Arabia


Remember “Lawrence of Arabia” by David Lean (1962, Columbia)?  The director’s cut is one of the longest films ever made (at 228 minutes).



The film is a spectacular biography of T. E. Lawrence (Peter O’Toole), a British military officer who helped united Arab tribes in face of the Turks after World War I.  Omar Sharif plays Sherif Ali, instrumental in leading the revolt.  What seems odd now is that this film would be regard a classic.  But since 1973 (with the Arab oil embargo), the role of Saudi Arabia in the world has become controversial, especially with respect to 9/11.



I only vaguely remember seeing the film the first time in college, but I saw it again at the Uptown Theater in Washington DC in 1989, when my boss from work (at the time Lewin ICF) showed up.  That theater has an unusually curved wide screen for presentation of 70 mm.

Much of the film was shot in Spain.

Maurice Jarre's music was stereotyped but stirring in its own time.
 
I can remember random comments that the protagonist was homosexual because he felt stimulated by riding on  camel’s back.  That was the perception of the time.

Berthold Werner picture of location in Seville, Spain, CCSA 3.0, Wikipedia.

No comments: